HobaCare Blog

(This blog post is the first from our Director of Strategic Growth, Cari Balbo, herbalist and maker of herbal skincare products at Ridge Pond Herbals. Over the coming months, Cari will be sharing more herbal infused jojoba recipes and different ideas for using jojoba here on our blog.)

jojoba lavender salve

If you’re looking for a gift to make for Mother’s Day, here’s an easy jojoba salve that is both simple to put together and luxurious to use. All you need is our jojoba, some beeswax, and dried lavender flowers and/or lavender essential oil.

jojoba

To start, you can use either plain jojoba or lavender infused jojoba (to make lavender infused jojoba, see our past blog post ). For every cup (8 fluid ounces) of jojoba you’ll be using, weigh out 1 ounce of beeswax on a scale (of course you can make smaller amounts, just keep the proportions the same; for this batch I used 2 fluid ounces of jojoba and a ¼ ounce by weight of beeswax). Combine the jojoba and beeswax in a heatproof pyrex or metal cup and place in an oven set at 200 degrees until the beeswax has melted (alternatively you can use a double boiler for this step).

Once the beeswax has melted, pour the hot liquid carefully (be sure to protect your hands) into a heat-proof container or containers (preferably glass or metal). If you didn’t use lavender infused jojoba for this, or just want to up the lavender scent in your final product, now is the time to add some lavender essential oil. When it comes to essential oils, I follow the typically safe rule of 12 drops of essential oil per 1 ounce of liquid (a 2% dilution rate). The salve jars pictured here are each 1 ounce sized and had 12 drops of my favorite lavender essential oil added to each while the jojoba/beeswax was still liquid. If your salve container is a different size, adjust the amount of essential oil (you can always add fewer than 12 drops per ounce, just don’t add more).

Once your salve is cool, you only need to label it and it will be ready for gifting. This salve is softer than some and will spread easily on the skin. It’s lovely for hands, lips, and all-over body for a fragrant, skin conditioning treat. The aromatherapy benefit of the lavender is an added bonus. Enjoy!

making lavender infused jojoba

In massage school, I was taught not to massage people that had cancer. I translated this to, people with cancer can/should not receive massage. What I was soon to find out is that people with cancer CAN and SHOULD have a massage... but, only in the hands of a therapist trained in oncology massage. Let me explain. Anyone with cancer can tell you about the miserable side effects of the disease and its various treatments. Chemo can cause severe nausea. Radiation can lead to fatigue. Cancer patients are constantly being stuck with needles, poked, prodded and find themselves in a continual state of anxiety wondering “what’s next”, “how will I cope”, “is this covered by my insurance”, “will I lose my job”... etc., etc. While the research is continuing, what we know is what our clients with cancer tell us.

And that is, massage helps them the most with these 5 symptoms:
Pain
Nausea
Fatigue
Anxiety
Depression

Oncology Patient Sits by a window

Most people with cancer will suffer from several, if not all, of these symptoms at some point. Symptoms may be caused by the treatment, or the disease itself. And in the end, it doesn’t really matter. Our goal as oncology massage therapists is to provide whatever relief we can, without causing any harm to the client. It’s so important that cancer patients who are getting a massage, do so from a therapist who has specialized training in oncology massage because cancer patients are at risk for things like lymphedema and blood clots. Therapists trained in oncology massage take a detailed history and spend extra time talking to the client before any hands-on work takes place. We are careful to talk about things like tumor sites, port sites, biopsy and/or removal of lymph nodes, surgery (where, when, why), what type of treatments have happened and when. We screen for DVT (deep vein thrombosis) and lymphedema history and risk. We take into account the person’s ability to lie on a massage table and for how long and in what positions. We take into account all of the pertinent information and devise a massage therapy plan using this information so that we do not cause any harm or exacerbate any condition. We also can refer someone to another therapist for different treatment if needed, for example, if a client is experiencing lymphedema, we can refer him or her to a therapist trained in treating lymphedema. Or, if our client is having issues with scarring, from surgery for example, we can refer them to a therapist trained in scar work.

hand massage

Oncology massage therapists are also trained to follow up with their clients so that the massage plan can be adjusted in order to better serve the client. For example, if a client finds that nausea becomes an issue on the third day after chemo, the therapist can adjust the plan to provide the massage on day 3 when symptoms are the worst. If the client finds it too taxing to get to the therapist for massage on day three, that can be adjusted to day 2 or 4. By keeping in constant contact with the client, the client can be best served and massage treatment can provide the maximum benefit.

Cancer Patient in Mirror

What really needs to happen now is to educate our health care providers in the benefits of massage therapy so they are sure to offer it to their patients. Think how great it would be if everyone undergoing symptom producing cancer treatments knew that massage could potentially help alleviate things like nausea, fatigue, pain, and anxiety! Imagine being able to offer cancer patients a relaxing, gentle touch to alleviate their symptoms rather than offering another pill or painful &/or expensive procedure. Massage clients with cancer report feeling a decrease in pain and anxiety, an increase in relaxation and energy after a massage. I had one client who would come to me for her massage feeling very nauseated, but afterward she would say “I’m going to go have my breakfast now. The nausea is gone.” I could visibly recognize a decrease of anxiety in her face as well. How amazingly satisfying for both the client and therapist!! That is a fringe benefit of being an oncology massage therapist that I had not anticipated. Massage can be a powerful complementary treatment for cancer patients. As well, oncology massage has such a spiritual and soulful component, that it’s as therapeutic for the giver as it is for the receiver. It’s not easy taking care of people who have received life-shattering news. It takes skill to listen acutely and not to label or make assumptions in someone’s treatment or even their choice not to have treatment. But if we can make a difference, comfort wise, in someone’s day, it’s a reward beyond compare.

Hopefully, as time goes on, massage will be offered in more and more settings and covered by more and more insurances. This is my little dream. I’ll do my best, where I can, to help this become a reality. In the meantime, I will continue to offer this wonderful treatment to people who live in a world of pain and anxiety producing fear. One person at a time, using training and skill to help alleviate suffering.

If you are would like more information on product sensitivity in cancer patients, read this article by Geralyn O'Brien on Cancer and Onoclogy Skincare.

Why I use jojoba for massage

One of the things that inspired me to become a massage therapist was my experience with a massage therapist who gave me a weekly massage after I was in a car accident. This wonderful woman encouraged me to attend school and become a massage therapist. I plan to talk more about her in the future, but today I want to thank her for introducing me to jojoba. That’s the product she used for all of her massages and I always loved it as a recipient of massage. I never came away feeling “greasy” or feeling like I needed to go home and take a shower. My skin just felt soft and well hydrated. Naturally, when it came time for me to select a product to use in my own practice, I began by using 100% pure jojoba from The Jojoba Company. I used it all through school, interspersed with all of the other products that other students used and the samples that were provided for us by various companies. I never liked using any other products better than jojoba. It continues to be my #1 massage medium of choice and here’s why:

hand massage

In my practice, I am blessed to specialize in oncology massage. You have probably known someone who has been through cancer and its treatment. But suffice it to say, the ensuing side effects often leave people nauseous, queasy, and with aversions to odors. Jojoba is totally unscented, clients simply feel its silkiness without any scent. It can, however, also serve as the perfect carrier for essential oils should that be desired for any application. Another benefit of using jojoba is that because of it being chemically different from an “oil” (it’s actually an ester… remember that from chemistry class?) it does not go rancid! We all know that smell, right? You’ve had that container of oil in the closet for just a little too long and woof, it smells bad, that oil is now wasted. Or, oops, that set of sheets sat too long, stuck in the back of the closet or laundry bag… and no amount of washing can get that rancid oil smell out of the sheets, so you have to pitch the sheets -- expensive. But not so when using jojoba. At least that has been my experience. I used to work with several other therapists who used other products for skin lubrication. We all used the same sheets and those sheets needed to be replaced yearly because of the odor they retained from the other products. Since I have been in solo practice, using only jojoba, I have never had that problem.

One of the other reasons I like using jojoba is that a little goes a long way. I was taught that deep tissue massage requires no lubrication, however, living in the great northeast where we have long winters, and lots of dry skin, I find I need just “a little something” sometimes. It’s easy to dispense just a tiny bit of jojoba to provide the exact amount of lubrication that I need. But for oncology massage, where I’m using very slow, long, and light pressure strokes, I can use more jojoba if needed due to dry and often sensitive skin which may be caused by some cancer treatments. Because jojoba is just one ingredient, not a conglomeration of a lot of different oils, extracts, scents, and who knows what else, it is hypoallergenic. And for people with sensitive skin this is huge! It also doesn’t clog pores, just another side benefit, so I use it for a facial massage with complete confidence.

Why I Use Jojoba for Massage

Probably the best reason I know of for choosing jojoba is for the way it feels. There are so many reasons that I use the product, but for me the bottom line is how it works for massage. I like the sheerness of the product, meaning, I get a really good feel for the tissues beneath my fingers. I feel that I can easily regulate how much glide or friction I can achieve. With oncology massage, it’s a lot about the glide, but not a light and tickly touch. There needs to be full contact with a gentle, smooth glide, and I can get that using jojoba. I have tried other products and find that I have to reapply much more often which really disrupts my flow. And speaking about me and my flow, I like that my own hands and arms don’t feel greasy and sticky after using jojoba. Yes, sometimes it IS about us, the massage therapists!! It’s great to be able to use a product that I love to have on MY skin. It’s a big deal, because who’s up to their elbows (literally) in skin lubricant on a daily basis… yup, you got it, we massage therapists!!

So keeping on thinking those deep massage thoughts, and sometimes gently gliding massage thoughts. But consider trying jojoba. You may discover a new delight in your life! Think deeply about what you are putting on your skin and your clients’. Oh, did I mention, jojoba comes in both Pesticide Free
and Organic? So there’s even less unwanted “stuff” getting in through your skin. Deep massage thoughts!

Introducing Ginnie, a friend that will be writing some great articles for us here about massage therapy. You may also see her at our booth at the AMTA conferences, if you attend, stop by and say "Hi".

https://www.amtamassage.org/index.html

Hi, I’m Ginnie. I’m an RN with a bachelor’s degree from Boston University. Several years ago I decided it was time to consider a second career (more on that in a future blog). Suffice it to say, for now, that sometimes you just know when it’s time to move on. I was fortunate to be able to attend Down East School of Massage . It was crazy… rediscovering all that anatomy and physiology and pathology. It’s all stuff that I learned so long ago (a great deal of which had been forgotten or rather, secured deeply in a hidden part of my brain). Amidst all of that re-learning, I remembered how much I really like this stuff! I chose massage therapy as my second career because it employs so many elements of my nursing career that I dearly love, you know, all of those bits that drew me to nursing in the first place. Things like nurturing, caring, listening, teaching, helping to decrease pain, being organized, using my own grey matter, and just plain hands-on helping people feel better. What I love about massage therapy is that it involves all of these aspects of care and at the end of the day I feel I’ve really done something worthwhile. I also love that I have not caused any pain via needles, catheters, or other scary medical apparatus. I feel I’ve helped someone with something as simple as an hour of uninterrupted relaxation (actually NOT that simple), or relief from physical pain, or by taking an emotional vacation, or maybe even by providing a little bit of the healing intention and love that the client can feel through my hands. How cool is that?! I am grateful for the opportunity massage therapy has given me to do what I really love. I never knew how much I would really love it.

Well then, after finding such a fulfilling new career and working at a private massage and bodywork studio, two pivotal events occurred. #1 - I began to wonder if there was a way that I could incorporate my medical background into my massage practice, and #2 - My husband was diagnosed with cancer. It was during his stem cell transplant that I met his first nurse who proclaimed that she was a massage therapist that became a nurse. When I told her I had just completed the opposite transformation, she exclaimed how lucky my husband was to have brought his own private massage therapist with him to the hospital and how I could make his transplant more comfortable with massage. Now honestly, I was stunned at this revelation because I was taught in school that cancer patients were not eligible to receive massage. Sadly I was too afraid to disclose my ignorance to this nurse or I would have asked her what it was that I could do for my husband.

Fast forward three months… my husband was home from the hospital and I was back to work where I asked my boss about massage for people with cancer. She recommended an amazing course offered by a woman teaching oncology massage. I went home that evening, found there was a course beginning in 3 weeks, only 4 hours away! The next day I asked my boss for the time off, it was granted and the next thing I knew I was immersed in the world of oncology massage with Tracy Walton. I could literally write an entire blog about what an amazing pioneer Tracy Walton is, how much I admire her and have learned from her. Tracy is a true mentor, humble to the core, unpretentious, and her integrity impeccable. In my book, they haven’t invented enough good words to describe this remarkable woman and the work she does. I ended up taking two of her courses and embarked on a new path incorporating OMT (oncology massage therapy) into my practice. I LOVE being able to offer knowledge, comfort and hope to those suffering from a new cancer diagnosis, going through the oftentimes horrendous rigors of treatment, post-treatment/cancer-free status, and beyond. Also, it’s lovely to be able to offer support to caregivers!! They also have such stress, sadness, and anxiety. What an honor it has been so far. I have spent a lot of energy educating… trying to get the word out that OMT is available and very worthwhile in so many respects.

So, that’s a bit about me. What about you? What drew you to massage therapy, and is it what you thought it would be? Let me know some of your deep massage thoughts!

At one of our staff meetings in November, Bill made the recommendation that instead of the usual office holiday gift exchange, we put the $25 towards buying items for the Waldoboro Food Pantry. The company matched the donation, which gave us $250 to spend on items for the local food pantry. On Wednesday, we closed the office at 1 and headed to a local store, filled up our carts, then delivered the goods. We really enjoyed this opportunity to give back this holiday season in our community!


donating to the waldoboro food pantry
donating to the waldoboro food pantry

donating to the waldoboro food pantry

"Each practitioner upon entering a profession is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession."

An active massage therapy practice is the result of hard work, education, and a credible professional reputation. We can advertise, use social media, network with other health professionals, but our reputation is the corner stone of successful practice. Ethical dilemmas are a part of our society and to think we are never going to be exposed to a professional ethical dilemma is naïve. What if your employer suggests you give extras in your workplace and you are strapped for money? We know this is unethical. Shall we sweep it under the rug and say it never happens? That would be like saying that crime does not exist. And since denying that this practice is not what therapeutic massage therapists do, what should we do now? People have faults. People make mistakes. We can deny this happens and it is all fantasy or we can investigate the ethical pathways that help us stay on the straight and narrow.

How do we practice ethically? We have to make sure that our professional identity is clear, otherwise the work can be laden with stress, be less satisfying and ethical dilemmas are apt to appear and remain unresolved. Therapists have to continually follow a code of ethics and attend continuing education in ethics. Ethics goes beyond school and the ethics class. We represent an entire profession and if we practice unethically it reflects back to our field. This is our responsibility. The value of attending an ethics class is to remind us of our boundaries that will help maintain our stellar reputations, bolster our existing character traits and toss around ways to solve ethical dilemmas in the work place environment. Operating without peer advice can lead to snap decisions that are not necessarily the best ethical avenue. Protect your corner stone of your practice by exploring the boundaries of the profession and sharing ethical dilemmas with your peers and with an expert with an objective ear!

Somewhere along the line of our practice, we have to develop value in our ethical foundation. Developing value in your practice represents an investment in maximal competence, a sense of duty to uphold standards, protecting relationships, boundaries and honesty with clients, employers and colleagues/health professionals. Work should be satisfying and grow with you and your practice involving developing goals.

How do we develop and keep the value in Ethics beyond school and into our practice?

  • Modeling – Adhere to the highest standards of conduct.
  • Enforcement – Unethical behavior should not be tolerated.
  • Communication – Maintain a open dialogue about ethics as an investment for schools, students, faculty, CE providers, therapists and industry ethics, and for our reputation as a whole.
  • Transparency – Openly post codes of ethics and mission statements. Have policies posted on how you deal with ethical issues.
  • Oversight – Support organizations, boards, associations, schools, etc. to maintain consistent enforcement policies and have committees that review codes.
  • Education – Promote ethical courses and dialogue in all aspects of our profession.
  • Prevention – Recognize at the outset where conflicts of interest may arise and put specific safeguards in place. Utilize and develop policies before a problem presents itself.

A code of ethics does not ensure ethical behavior. We have to construct an ethical culture for our industry and it starts with our investment and commitment to massage therapy and bodywork.

Investment and commitment will help you to create a legacy to leave to the profession of massage therapy. Remember this is your journey, but sometimes you might need a road map, so here are a few suggestions:

  • Involve yourself in taking continuing education
  • Find a mentor who can help you see the forest through the trees
  • Involve yourself in your state chapter – join a committee
  • Look at how you can further massage in your community or in your state
  • Make a five year plan – look at your life as a journey and plan your route.

Ask yourself, why am I in this profession? What can I do to further the profession?

  • Start small – you do not have to be President tomorrow, either in your state chapter or for the National Board.
  • Do you want to teach? Look into the standards for teaching from the Alliance for Massage Therapy Education. AFMTE.org
  • Take courses that will prepare you to teach.
  • Surround yourself with individuals who are visionary.
  • Link yourself to a school that supports standards, provides CE hours, and supports graduates.
  • Reach out and meet your peers. These are people of like minds.
  • Research massage – The Massage Therapy Foundation has provided us with the mechanisms of research. Another wonderful organization to investigate!
  • Write – the Alliance has many members who are authors and publishers attend our conferences. Authors are giving. There are many present here!
  • Present about massage.
  • Get massage yourself.
  • Attend ethics classes and share your experiences with peers.
  • Remember self-care and prevent burn out.
  • Whatever you do, remember that massage therapy provides a social service that is unquestionably valuable to the human race. Be proud to be a massage therapist. This is a wonderful, satisfying career. Enjoy the ride and give back. Create your legacy and retain the value of practicing ethically!

Reprinted with permission from https://downeastschoolofmassage.net/recent_blogs/practicing-ethically

Our guest author today is Allissa Haines. She runs a massage practice and collaborative wellness center in Massachusetts. She partners with Michael Reynolds to create business and marketing resources for massage therapists like you at MassageBusinessBlueprint.com. Check out the Massage Business Blueprint podcast on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, or at the website.

massage business blueprint

There are a million different kinds of massage therapists. We work in spas and hospitals and do home visits. We wear jeans and scrubs and button-down shirts. We work with athletes, new moms, construction workers, babies, people with cancer, people with anxiety, and people who just think massage therapy feels great. But every single one of these massage therapists has one thing in common: they were all beginners once. And being a beginner can be scary as heck. Even if you're also feeling well-trained and excited!

If you're a student and preparing to start your new career in massage therapy, congrats! Allow me to offer you a little graduation gift: some solid advice that every massage new therapist should know before striking out on their own.

jojoba for massage therapy

Act like a pro. With everyone.

As you finish up school, treat every practice client and every treatment like a real-life professional situation. Even when you practice and work on friends and family, be a pro about it. This is important for three reasons: it’s good practice for you to get your routines and scripts smooth, it helps your friends and family see and respect you as a professional, and consistent professional behavior is the foundation for a great reputation.

Being super professional with your practice clients not only impresses them in the short term, but also impacts how they’ll think of you after you graduate. But what does it mean to show professionalism? What does this actually look like in practice?

  • Show up on time.
  • Have all your equipment and paperwork ready to go.
  • Practice proper hygiene.
  • Drape conservatively.
  • Maintain appropriate boundaries while in the role of massage therapist. (Even when your friend wants to gossip or your mom makes a joke about cellulite.)
  • Stay within your scope of practice and don’t make any wild claims about what massage can do.
  • Maintain client confidentiality.

Does this mean that you can’t be yourself? Of course not! You don’t have to wear a suit or talk like a robot to be professional. The idea is not to be somebody else. The goal is to be the most respectful, clean, and reliable version of you. Be your best business self, even when your client is Grandma or Aunt Kim or your bestie from middle school.

jojoba for facial massage

Know the most common massage complaints

Do you know the number one complaint people make about their massage therapist? “She talked too much.”

When you start up and you’re excited to be meeting people and working, it’s easy to slip into ‘chatty’ mode with clients. Resist! Resist the temptation to give longer answers and be super friendly during a massage, even if your clients are chatty themselves. You’ll likely get the same batch of questions with each new client:

  • Where did you go to school?
  • How long have you been doing this?
  • What did you do before this?

Be mindful that some people will ask questions because they are a little nervous or because they don’t know it’s okay to not talk.

Fight the urge to initiate any unnecessary conversation and give the shortest possible answers when answering a direct question. It’s even okay to say, “It’s so tempting to use this time to chat, but you’ll get a better massage if I don’t talk and we focus on you!”

The second most common complaint? “She didn’t get to the areas that needed work.”

It’s amazing how many experienced massage therapists end up with a poor reputation simply because they give the massage they want, rather than the one the client has asked for. Luckily, this is an easy situation to avoid.

Be sure to listen very carefully to what the client asks for before their massage, and then repeat it back to them with your plan for the massage to get their approval.

Here’s an example: In your verbal intake before the massage, a client rubs their right shoulder and says, “My shoulder is sore and I’m just all-around tired.”

To be sure you are address what they need, you’ll want to clarify the details and present your plan. It may sound like, “Ok, we can address your whole body and spend some extra time on your shoulder as well. It’s your right shoulder? Can you show me where exactly you’re feeling pain?”

Whenever appropriate, address that primary issue first and check in with the client before you move on. Ask, “How is this shoulder feeling? Is there anything you would like me to go back to?”

jojoba for massage

Don’t be afraid to admit what you don’t know

You’re a massage therapist. Not a pharmacist, physical therapist, or herbalist. You’re a massage therapist. You can’t possibly know all the things right out of school. (Or ever.) You will never know all the answers to all the things right off the top of your head.

So when you are reading an intake form and it lists a medication or health issue you’ve never heard of, get more information. Admit openly, “I’ve never worked with a client with joint hypermobility issues. What factors do I need to be extra mindful of?”

Once you’ve talked it through with the client, let them know you’re going to take a minute to look it up before you begin the treatment as they are getting on the table. Most clients won’t mind spending an extra few minutes getting cozy on the table before their massage, especially when you are using that time to craft a safe and effective session just for them.

If your client asks you for a technique you don’t know how to do (or aren’t sure is safe), let them know you’ll find out more and get back to them before their next appointment – and follow through. Showing commitment to improvement means your clients can look forward to a better massage each and every time they see you.

pure jojoba for massage therapy

Choose the right products.

I tried so many different massage creams and lotions and oils my first few years as a massage therapist. I slipped and slid with greasy formulations. I itched from additives and scents and over-laundered stained linens. I worried about clients with nut allergies and read labels like a new scholar.

Then I found jojoba.

I can use jojoba for light massage on very fragile skin and also for deep work that requires grip and traction. A very small amount goes a long way, so I use much less than with other products.

Jojoba is safe for clients with allergies and safe for me. I realized early on that my body is soaking up my product for more than 20 hours a week. I wanted to feel good about what is and isn’t in the product and jojoba fits that criteria.

It’s a resilient product that can tolerate heating, cooling, and reheating. Jojoba won’t oxidize or go rancid and doesn’t require refrigeration. And it won’t stain your 100% cotton sheets, so you’ll save a ton on linens long-term.

It’s hard to find a product that is just right for every massage client and every treatment, but I think jojoba comes close.

And on the rare occasion when Jojoba isn’t the best solution and a client absolutely needs a cream or lotion, I turn to PurePro, (whose owner told me about Jojoba when I was first learning about all this!).

jojoba for massage

Your reaction matters more than the glitch.

Draping issues will happen. Fix it quickly and move along. You will trip and make a loud noise during a deep relaxation treatment. If the client obviously notices quietly say, “Sorry about that,” and move on.

You will double book or accidentally no-show for an appointment because your calendar freaked out. Apologize, schedule a makeup treatment at no charge and move on.

Dumb things will inevitably occur in your business. You will make mistakes. If you are graceful in handling glitches, if they are rare glitches, and you make a real effort to prevent them moving forward, people will forgive you and respect you.

You got this.

Massage therapy can be an amazing career. Take all your education, your enthusiasm, and your passion for learning, and dive in. Everyone is nervous at first, but know that you're not the first beginner on the planet. Take a deep breath and know that you have what it takes. Welcome to the world of massage!

We received this note from one of our customers, we thought we'd share her great uses for jojoba throughout the seasons. We added additional notes and links in parenthesis.

There are some Maine products that serve us well through the sweltering days of August to the frigid days of January and every day in between. Jojoba is one of them! These are my personal experiences.

SPRING:
Those nasty black fly bites that surround our hairline after an afternoon clearing and/or planting our gardens are no match to this magical elixir. Rub Jojoba on the bites when you come inside and poof the action stops.
(works well on mosquito bites as well, adding a drop of lavender essential oil, or using lavender infused jojoba also works wonders on insect bites-- see our post on how to make lavender infused jojoba).

SUMMER:
Get into a patch of Wild Parsnip? Tame the results and shorten the healing with Jojoba. (also works well on other skin issues as well, especially for those with sensitive skin, check out our post about using jojoba for cradle cap).

FALL:
Keep the summer shine with a Jojoba and Himalayan salt rub on your face and hands. For real! (you can also use sugar, it can be a bit less abrasive for those with sensitive skin, check out our post on how to make jojoba sugar scrub).

jojoba salt hand scrub

WINTER:
Oh, that wood-stove heat dry skin just drinks Jojoba.It's nice to be warm AND supple! And for those of us who suffer from Venus Stasis Dermatitis, put your feet up, wear compression socks, and use Jojoba to keep the itching at bay.

And year round, there is no better make-up remover than Jojoba! Enjoy! -Jan

Do you have any great seasonal uses for jojoba to share? Send them along to us, we'll share them.

We were disappointed to learn that the North Atlantic Region Whole Foods Markets have decided to stop carrying our product in their stores. Their decision was not based on the quality or price of our jojoba, but rather, as they stated, “current directions we’re taking as a company”. You can read the full Press Release here.

Our jojoba has been carried in the Boston area Whole Foods Markets for 25 years, and we consider the store in Portland, ME our home store. Our main concern is that our customers will still be able to find the First Press quality that only we offer in Pesticide Free and Certified Organic HobaCare and Jojoba Baby that they have been using for years.

We appreciate your loyalty to our First Press quality jojoba. We encourage our customers to support local businesses by purchasing our jojoba from their neighborhood natural food market or co-op, however with this development, not all customers will have a local purchasing option. We will be contact more co-ops and natural food stores over the coming weeks but customers asking for the product is more effective than anything.

If you would like to purchase from us directly, we offer Free Shipping on any Retail Order of $35 or more.

There are so many items around the household that can be cared for with a drop of jojoba. Most recently, I purchased a new pair of Gingher scissors. The use and care guide states "Occasionally placing a drop of oil in the pivot area will facilitate a smooth cutting action." Naturally, I use jojoba for this lubrication need. Not only is it technically a wax ester, which means it won't get gummy or attract dust, it also won't stain clothing (an important thing since these are sewing shears).

Lubricating gingher shears with jojoba

Not only will these shears be lubricated occasionally with a drop of jojoba (putting some in an old dropper bottle is a great way to use with the precision needed), they will also be occasionally wiped down with the tiniest bit of jojoba and a soft, dry cloth to inhibit rust on the metal. Around here, jojoba is also using to lubricate the sewing machines (and sergers and coverstitch machines as well).

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Fabulous, fabulous stuff!

Sarah L.

I've ordered jojoba before and your jojoba is leaps and bounds above any other. I could immediately feel the difference in the way it looks, smells & feels on my skin. The first thought in my head was that this is truly an elegant product. I'm glad I purchased it.

Robyne Lopez

The results were instant! My hair not only had sheen, but totally eliminated the friz!
I threw away all of the other goopey hair gels.

Terri Swain

Every one of your claims are true - the lack of staining and smell, the affinity with the skin, and my clients love that they don't get up from the table feeling like greased pigs (my words). Of course, as a massage therapist, none of that would matter if the grip and glide weren't perfect... and they are.

Sara Garvin, LMT

The very best thing about jojoba is that is does not become rancid and aids in the integrity of essential oils.

helen Schultz

I want you to know I appreciate your wonderful customer service. There is never a delay in the shipment of my order and I very much appreciate it.

Shirley

After 35 radiation treatments I recommended your product to my friend for his burns. Like magic it is soothing and healing the area. Wonderful jojoba. Thank you.

Jayne Johnson

I ordered one gallon of jojoba online yesterday afternoon and I received it this morning at 9:30!!!!!
Thank you so much for your prompt service.

Sarah Litchfield, LMT

Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! I have had the pleasure of working with your excellent Jojoba for 11 years as a massage therapist and also for personal use. I have occasionally tried other highly regarded massage oils and lotions over the years but always come back to your product. It is simply the best!

Janet Walker

The Jojoba esters is an excellent bodywork tool (multiple treatment modalities) as well as at home for my skin. I've even used it to mix with essential oils and given it as a gift.

Jonna Climie